Thank You!

December 30th, 2009
Welcome our web site about concerts in this area!

Thank you to everyone who participated in our concert. We raised a final total of $330 to purchase 280 CFLs and with the Home Depot and NSTAR contributions of 60 and 50 CFLs, respectively, we presented a total of 390 bulbs to the Senior Center today. Here is a photo of Ben presenting the first few packs.

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Why Are We Donating Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs)?

November 26th, 2009

The calculations in the links below show that compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), cost less overall, last longer, and do less damage to the environment.  You can display our incandescent and CFL comparison as web page or download the Excel spreadsheet and see what happens if you change the assumptions.

Projected savings from use of CFLs by Sudbury senior citizens

More information on the carbon cycle at Wikipedia:

Illustration of the carbon cycle at Wikimedia

Diagram of the carbon cycle. The black numbers indicate how much carbon is stored in various reservoirs, in billions of tons (“GtC” stands for GigaTons of Carbon and figures are circa 2004). The dark blue numbers indicate how much carbon moves between reservoirs each year. The sediments, as defined in this diagram, do not include the ~70 million GtC of carbonate rock and kerogen.

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Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky

November 25th, 2009

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (7 May 1840 [O.S. 25 April] – 6 November 1893 [O.S. 25 October]) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. He wrote some of the most popular concert and theatrical music in the current classical repertoire, including the ballets Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, the 1812 Overture, his First Piano Concerto, seven symphonies, and the opera Eugene Onegin.

Source: Wikipedia

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Camille Saint-Saëns

November 25th, 2009

Charles-Camille Saint-Saëns (9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) was a French composer, organist, conductor, and pianist, known especially for The Carnival of the Animals, Danse Macabre, Samson and Delilah, Havanaise, Introduction and Rondo capriccioso, and his Symphony No. 3 (Organ Symphony).

Camille Saint-Saëns

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

November 25th, 2009

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (full baptismal name Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart (27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791)), was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. He composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, piano, operatic, and choral music. He is among the most enduringly popular of classical composers.

Source: Wikipedia

Mozart portrait by Croce

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Max Bruch

November 25th, 2009

Max Christian Friedrich Bruch (6 January 1838 – 2 October 1920), also known as Max Karl August Bruch, was a German Romantic composer and conductor who wrote over 200 works, including three violin concertos, one of which is a staple of the violin repertoire.

Source: Wikipedia

Max Bruch

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Joseph Haydn

November 25th, 2009

Franz Joseph Haydn (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was an Austrian composer. He was one of the most important, prolific and prominent composers of the classical period. He is often called the “Father of the Symphony” and “Father of the String Quartet” because of his important contributions to these genres. He was also instrumental in the development of the piano trio and in the evolution of sonata form.

Haydn portrait by Thomas Hardy

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Johann Christian Bach

November 25th, 2009

Johann Christian Bach (September 5, 1735 – January 1, 1782) was a composer of the Classical era, the eleventh and youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach. He is sometimes referred to as ‘the London Bach’ or ‘the English Bach’, due to his time spent living in the British capital. He is noted for influencing the concerto style of Mozart.

Source: Wikipedia

Johann Christian Bach portrait by Thomas Gainsborough

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Chant sans paroles (Song without words) Op. 2 No. 3 by Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky

November 25th, 2009

Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky (1820-1869): Chant sans paroles (Song without words) Op. 2 No. 3

It was originally written for piano as part of a collection of three short piano pieces called Souvenir de Haspal, a musical set of postcards commemorating a vacation Tchaikovsky and his brother took in the summer of 1867. It is more in the style of Romantic period than his typical full flowering orchestral arrangement. Nevertheless, it remained popular among public.

– From Wikipedia and other www sources

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Allegro appassionato in B minor for cello and piano, Op. 43 by Camille Saint-Saëns

November 25th, 2009

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921): Allegro appassionato in B minor for cello and piano, Op. 43

Saint- Saëns composed the piece shortly after he married Marie Laurie Emillie Truffot in 1875. The solo cello enters with a bouncy tune immediately after a few syncopated chords. It has a form of A – B – A – B (extended) in a new key. It has lively rhythms and remains one of the most popular works by Saint-Saëns.

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